Take Ivy

November 19, 2013 - Comment

Described by The New York Times as, “a treasure of fashion insiders,” Take Ivy was originally published in Japan in 1965, setting off an explosion of American-influenced “Ivy Style” fashion among students in the trendy Ginza shopping district of Tokyo. The product of four sartorial style enthusiasts, Take Ivy is a collection of candid photographs

Buy Now! $9.58Amazon.com Price
(as of 06/24/2017 2:25 am CDT - Details)

Described by The New York Times as, “a treasure of fashion insiders,” Take Ivy was originally published in Japan in 1965, setting off an explosion of American-influenced “Ivy Style” fashion among students in the trendy Ginza shopping district of Tokyo. The product of four sartorial style enthusiasts, Take Ivy is a collection of candid photographs shot on the campuses of America’s elite, Ivy League universities. The series focuses on men and their clothes, perfectly encapsulating the unique academic fashion of the era. Whether lounging in the quad, studying in the library, riding bikes, in class, or at the boathouse, the subjects of Take Ivy are impeccably and distinctively dressed in the finest American-made garments of the time.

Take Ivy is now considered a definitive document of this particular style, and rare original copies are highly sought after by “trad” devotees worldwide. A small-run reprint came out in Japan in 2006 and sold out almost immediately. Now, for the first time ever, powerHouse is reviving this classic tome with an all-new English translation. Ivy style has never been more popular, in Japan or stateside, proving its timeless and transcendent appeal. Take Ivy has survived the decades and is an essential object for anyone interested in the history or future of fashion.

Photographs from Take Ivy
Click on the thumbnails to enlarge.

View Larger View Larger View Larger View Larger

Comments

Vivien Li says:

old school This book came in through Amazon Prime just this morning, and it’s everything that style blogs have hyped it up to be. It was first popularized by M. Williams of A Continuous Lean, and when he scanned photos from his original 1965 edition, the books were going on eBay for as high as $500. At $14, it’s a steal.A small hardcover with glossy pages, the volume clocks in at around half an inch. Underneath the dust jacket is a gorgeous orange cloth-covered book embossed with seals of the eight Ivy League institutions. The preface introduces the modern edition (in English, of course) and references the original Japanese volume. In an effort to maintain authenticity, “The translation of the original text for this English-language edition has not been edited for the purpose of updating or revising facts, names, or other matters.” (This note seems irrelevant until we get to discussions about student body size and other time-sensitive statistics.)The book’s pictures are…

Chris Hogan "OTC" says:

A faithful reproduction, original images and all I run the menswear blog Off the Cuff ([…]) and have been following this reprinting of Take Ivy since it was first announced.I notice that a couple of the reviews here commented negatively on the quality of the book’s images, so let me clarify a very important point. powerHouse Books didn’t simply reprint Take Ivy, they recreated Take Ivy. As they explained to me, apart from the English translation, it a replica of the 1965 edition right down to the paper, binding, flip jacket, and image quality.The images are not as crisp and clear as we would expect today because they are from the 1965 book – the exact images that you would see in a vintage copy. Would I like to have seen shots from the original negatives, if they are even available? I suppose so; but the goal if this book was to bring fans the original Take Ivy in every way possible.So, in a nutshell, what you are getting with this book is the most exacting reproduction possible, translated…

Write a comment