The Grateful Dead Movie

December 4, 2013 - Comment

The Grateful Dead Movie on Blu-ray for the first time, in a deluxe 2-disc version, with the feature film on Blu-ray and a DVD loaded with an extensive slate of bonus features five hours of content in all! Co-directed by Jerry Garcia, The Grateful Dead Movie was originally released in 1977, and captures performances from

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The Grateful Dead Movie on Blu-ray for the first time, in a deluxe 2-disc version, with the feature film on Blu-ray and a DVD loaded with an extensive slate of bonus features five hours of content in all! Co-directed by Jerry Garcia, The Grateful Dead Movie was originally released in 1977, and captures performances from five October 1974 shows at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom.

The film has been carefully transferred from the original 35mm film negative in High Definition and is presented in 1.78:1 widescreen aspect ratio. The audio options include a 5.1 DTS HD Master Audio presentation of the original theatrical audio mix, a DTS 5.1 audio mix, mixed from the master multitrack tapes, and a PCM 2.0 audio mix, also mixed from the master multitrack tapes.

Program Listing:
1. Animation
2. U.S. Blues
3. One More Saturday Night
4. Bill Graham’s Crew Introduction
5. Goin Down The Road Feeling Bad
6. Soundcheck
7. Truckin
8. Eyes Of The World
9. Ripped Off Fan
10. Sugar Magnolia
11. It’s Like A Continuous Trip
12. Intermission
13. Playing In The Band
14. Levy Gets In
15. Stella Blue
16. Casey Jones
17. The Om People
18. Weirdness From He s Gone
19. Morning Dew
20. Encore Break
21. Johnny B. Goode
22. It Must Have Been The Roses/End Credits

Bonus Songs:
Uncle John’s Band
Sugaree
The Other One
Spanish Jam
Mind Left Body Jam
The Other One
Scarlet Begonias
China Cat Sunflower
I Know You Rider
Dark Star
Weather Report Suite

Comments

S. Weis "GR8FUL 1" says:

David Lemieux Does It Again! David Lemieux is the Grateful Dead organization’s current “keeper of The Vault”, having taken over for the band’s original archivist Dick Latvala, may he R.I.P.Remastering The Grateful Dead Movie is his second major video project, the first being “The Closing of Winterland”, which is also highly recommended.Even though the Dead were at their creative peak in 1974 (my opinion, of course), the audio and video quality of the multitude of concert videos that have been released by and of this band arguably improves as we move forward in time, if for no other reason than technology. Simply stated, they were able to make a better recording in, say, 1990 than in 1974.All that changed when when David Lemieux decided to go back to some of earlier masterpieces and painstakingly remaster them.I own The Grateful Dead Movie on VHS and on LaserDisc. Yet they rarely get played due to lack of decent audio quality. There’s simply so much more to enjoy…

Christopher Henrici says:

ILLUMINATING LOOK AT THE BAND, FANS & PA The Grateful Dead movie came out in 1977 but consists of footage shot during an October 1974 series of concerts at the Winterland, the last to use the “wall of Sound” system, and the shows preceeded a break from touring but by the time it came out, they had already resumed performing. It is as much about the fans, the sound crew, the “wall of sound” PA, and promoter Bill Graham as about the band. When I saw it back when it came out and a couple times at local high school auditoriums over the next few years, I was always left with the feeling that it was a little short on uninterupted concert footage. The film tries to cover so much ground the music performances suffer. The other place I felt it was lacking was the sound mix. This new DVD release basically fixes my two main gripes about the original release. It has a second bonus disc of extra song performances, and it has been remixed- it now sounds alot better (but for those who want the original mix, you can play it that way too…

Grateful Jerry "Dark Star -> The Other One" says:

October 1974 Winterland Arena, San Francisco, CA Let me start off by pointing out that there’s really nothing here that isn’t already out on the standard dvd release and, while the movie is in blu ray, the bonus stuff isn’t. By the early ’70’s, the Dead were playing bigger and bigger places requiring a bigger and bigger sound system eventually leading to The Wall Of Sound. The Dead had already started their record company the year before and now between having to deal with both Grateful Dead Records and their “new” expensive sound system, the band was becoming a little burned out. In October 1974, the Dead played what many people thought might be their last concerts at Winterland Arena in San Francisco starting on the 16th (Bob Weir’s 27th birthday) to the 20th known as The Last One. the band had already decided to record the shows on multi track for an album and shortly before the run of shows, the band decided to hire a film crew as well. This movie became a passion for Jerry Garcia as he devoted a massive amount of time to it…

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